Advancing In Your Career Through Certification

Certification will look good on your resume, and perhaps grant you access to new opportunities. Before you go to your employer with your hand out though, you’re going to need to prepare. Treat it like a job interview. Do your research, and be prepared to answer hard questions.

How Will Certification Benefit You?

This isn’t the time for indulging whims, you need to be clear about why you need this training, and how it benefits you. It might look interesting, but that’s something you do on your own time and dime.

For professional short courses and certifications, you need to ask yourself if it’s a logical development of your career path. Do others in similar roles to you benefit from having these certifications? Will they really help you advance your career with your employer? Now it’s time to ask yourself the really hard question.

How Will Certification Benefit Your Employer?

Your employer isn’t going to just rubber stamp this, especially not when times are hard. Forget about how that short course will benefit you, and think about how it’ll benefit your employer. They’ll be asking themselves if you’re worth it.

Answer that question for them by showing them your track record of success, and what that’s given them. Build upon that by outlining how certification will pay dividends for them. Point to sources that show how certification will enable you to increase profits, acquire new customers, increase the company’s efficiency, or decrease their costs. If you haven’t got such a good track record, then work to turn it around before you approach your employer.

Be reasonable with your request. Asking a small company scraping by to fund a course that costs thousands is unrealistic. To help negotiate this you can outline cheaper courses to give your employer options, but be clear about why they’re cheaper. Another alternative is to offer to help pay for the training, if you can afford it. It’ll show commitment, and partial funding is a big step above no funding.

Also, be realistic about the amount of time it takes. Your employer is still paying your wages, and isn’t going to be happy about seeing your desk empty for long periods. Short courses are a good compromise, minimising the loss of productivity for your employer, whilst still giving you valuable training.

Your employer may be unwilling to provide. Don’t be confrontational here. Instead, work with your employer to see if there are alternatives. Are they prepared to re-evaluate in a few months, or after your next performance review?The Real Hard WorkYou’ve got the certificate, and put the details on your resume. Congratulations, but now the hard work is really beginning. Your employer is going to expect to see returns on their investment.

 Don’t disappoint them. Put everything you’ve learned into practise, and don’t horde the knowledge you’ve gained either. If you can pass it on to your colleagues and raise the performance of those around you, then you’ll mark yourself out as a leader.

Certification will look good on your resume, and perhaps grant you access to new opportunities. Before you go to your employer with your hand out though, you’re going to need to prepare. Treat it like a job interview. Do your research, and be prepared to answer hard questions.

How Will Certification Benefit You?

This isn’t the time for indulging whims, you need to be clear about why you need this training, and how it benefits you. It might look interesting, but that’s something you do on your own time and dime. For professional short courses and certifications, you need to ask yourself if it’s a logical development of your career path.

Do others in similar roles to you benefit from having these certifications?

Will they really help you advance your career with your employer?

Now it’s time to ask yourself the really hard question…How Will Certification Benefit Your Employer?

Your employer isn’t going to just rubber stamp this, especially not when times are hard.

 Forget about how that short course will benefit you, and think about how it’ll benefit your employer. They’ll be asking themselves if you’re worth it. Answer that question for them by showing them your track record of success, and what that’s given them. Build upon that by outlining how certification through short courses will pay dividends for them. Point to sources that show how certification will enable you to increase profits, acquire new customers, increase the company’s efficiency, or decrease their costs. If you haven’t got such a good track record, then work to turn it around before you approach your employer.

Be reasonable with your request. Asking a small company scraping by to fund training courses that costs thousands is unrealistic. To help negotiate this you can outline cheaper courses to give your employer options, but be clear about why they’re cheaper. Another alternative is to offer to help pay for the training, if you can afford it. It’ll show commitment, and partial funding is a big step above no funding.

Also, be realistic about the amount of time it takes. Your employer is still paying your wages, and isn’t going to be happy about seeing your desk empty for long periods. My Training courses are a good compromise, minimising the loss of productivity for your employer, whilst still giving you valuable training.

Your employer may be unwilling to provide. Don’t be confrontational here. Instead, work with your employer to see if there are alternatives. Are they prepared to re-evaluate in a few months, or after your next performance review?The Real Hard WorkYou’ve got the certificate, and put the details on your resume. Congratulations, but now the hard work is really beginning.

Your employer is going to expect to see returns on their investment. Don’t disappoint them. Put everything you’ve learned into practise, and don’t horde the knowledge you’ve gained either. If you can pass it on to your colleagues and raise the performance of those around you, then you’ll mark yourself out as a leader.

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